• A
  • A
  • A
  • ABC
  • ABC
  • ABC
  • А
  • А
  • А
  • А
  • А
Regular version of the site

Conference in St. Petersburg: ‘Cultural and Economic Changes under Cross-national Perspective’

From November 10 to 14, the HSE Laboratory for Comparative Social Research’s (LCSR NRU HSE) 4th International Annual Research Conference 'Cultural and Economic changes under cross-national perspective' will take place in St. Petersburg. The programme includes dozens of themed sessions on current social, political and economic problems, and lectures by the world’s leading sociologists.

Each year, the conference brings together Russian and international academics who work on issues related to: values, trust and social capital; corruption and inequality in our changing world; the role played by religion in political activity; and other social problems from a cross-national perspective.

Most conference participants are involved in the LCSR research network, which means they are able to develop their projects in close cooperation with each other, and each new conference demonstrates their professional growth. Lectures will be given by Laboratory for Comparative Social Research managers. Ronald Inglehart, Academic Supervisor and Manager at the LCSR, is giving a lecture entitled  ‘From Class Conflict to Cultural Issues—and Back Again?’. Christian Weltsel, LCSR Professor and Chair for Political Culture Research at the Leuphana University in Germany, is giving a talk about civilization turned into human empowerment. Eduard Ponarin, LCSR Director, will present his research into the links between the number of suicides committed and the spread of religious sects in the United States.

Bogdan Voicu (Romanian Academy of Sciences), Musa Shteiwi (The University of Jordan), Eric Uslaner (Maryland University), and Arye Rattner (The University of Haifa), who have worked in collaboration with the Laboratory for a considerable time, are also speaking at the conference.

This year’s conference will also see Arne Kalleberg (University of North Carolina) take part – for the first time – with a presentation on non-standard employment (and its consequences), and Alejandro Moreno (World Association for Public Opinion Research), who is also joining for the first time, will give a presentation on research into the development of democratic principles and norms.

See also:

Trapped by a Flexible Schedule: The Pain and Price of Freelance Work

A flexible schedule is one of the main advantages of freelance work. But don’t rejoice in your freedom just yet: self-employment often disrupts the balance between life and work and takes up more time than traditional office work. HSE University researchers Denis Strebkov and Andrey Shevchuk investigated the downsides of independent work.

Inherited Altruism: How the Family Supports the Culture of Volunteering

The main channel for transmitting the value of volunteerism in Russia is from parents to children, HSE University researchers have found. Younger generations in families begin helping others as they grow up, following the example set by their elders.

Personality at Work

The way one thinks, feels and acts in certain circumstances can determine career opportunities in terms of employment and pay. For the first time in Russia, Ksenia Rozhkova has examined the effect of personality characteristics on employment.

Anthropological Pirouette

For a long time, it was mainly art and theatre critics who wrote for a wide audience about dance from a spectator’s perspective. Later, philosophers and ethnographers began to study dance from different angles. But only when people with first-hand experience, i.e. dancers, joined in, did dance and movement studies get off to a real start. Irina Sirotkina explains how dance studies evolved in the 20th century.

Returning to Moscow for a Double Degree Programme

Inspired by her exchange experience in Moscow during her undergraduate studies, French student Marion Jacquart decided to do her Master’s at the School for Advanced Studies in the Social Sciences in Paris because it has a double degree agreement with HSE University. As she finishes her programme in Comparative Social Research in Moscow, where she has been based for the last year doing research for her Master’s thesis on feminism, she shared her experience and impressions with the HSE News Service.

Russia’s Middle Class: Who Are Its Members and How Do They Spend Their Money?

The HSE Centre for Studies of Income and Living Standards studied the dynamics of the middle class and its behaviour with regard to paid services. The study was based on data drawn from the HSE Russian Longitudinal Monitoring Survey (RLMS-HSE) for the years 2000 to 2017, and the results were presented at the 20th April International Academic Conference hosted by HSE.

HSE Gears up for Staff and Student Conference: A Look Back at the Faculty of Social Sciences

On March 20, a conference for HSE staff and students will take place at HSE. It will consider the university’s development programme and elect the new Academic Council. The previous conference took place five years ago, in 2014, and the university has changed a lot since then. HSE News Service spoke with some of the university leaders about how their own work at the University has changed over this period.

One among Many: The Sociology of Moving in a Mob

Anyone moving in a large crowd, absorbed in their phone and yet avoiding collisions, follows certain laws that they themselves create. The movement of individuals as a condition for the movement of masses is the subject of a recent study by Dr. Andrey Korbut.

How Gender Inequality Is Reproduced on Social Media

Researchers from Higher School of Economics analyzed 62 million public posts on the most popular Russian social networking site VK and found that both men and women mention sons more often than daughters. They also found that posts featuring sons receive 1.5 times more likes. The results have been published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America.

The Keepers of the Ruble

Post-Soviet life and the economic ups and downs of recent years have changed the attitude of Russians towards saving. Now, it is not the less fortunate who save, but the more intelligent, according to Elena Berdysheva and Regina Romanova. Or, more to the point, it’s the more intelligent women: domestic finances are usually dealt with by females. At HSE’s recent XIX April International Academic Conference, researchers explained how Russians adjusted and optimized family budgets following the crisis of 2014-2017 and how this relates to gender issues.