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Regular version of the site

Conference in St. Petersburg: ‘Cultural and Economic Changes under Cross-national Perspective’

From November 10 to 14, the HSE Laboratory for Comparative Social Research’s (LCSR NRU HSE) 4th International Annual Research Conference 'Cultural and Economic changes under cross-national perspective' will take place in St. Petersburg. The programme includes dozens of themed sessions on current social, political and economic problems, and lectures by the world’s leading sociologists.

Each year, the conference brings together Russian and international academics who work on issues related to: values, trust and social capital; corruption and inequality in our changing world; the role played by religion in political activity; and other social problems from a cross-national perspective.

Most conference participants are involved in the LCSR research network, which means they are able to develop their projects in close cooperation with each other, and each new conference demonstrates their professional growth. Lectures will be given by Laboratory for Comparative Social Research managers. Ronald Inglehart, Academic Supervisor and Manager at the LCSR, is giving a lecture entitled  ‘From Class Conflict to Cultural Issues—and Back Again?’. Christian Weltsel, LCSR Professor and Chair for Political Culture Research at the Leuphana University in Germany, is giving a talk about civilization turned into human empowerment. Eduard Ponarin, LCSR Director, will present his research into the links between the number of suicides committed and the spread of religious sects in the United States.

Bogdan Voicu (Romanian Academy of Sciences), Musa Shteiwi (The University of Jordan), Eric Uslaner (Maryland University), and Arye Rattner (The University of Haifa), who have worked in collaboration with the Laboratory for a considerable time, are also speaking at the conference.

This year’s conference will also see Arne Kalleberg (University of North Carolina) take part – for the first time – with a presentation on non-standard employment (and its consequences), and Alejandro Moreno (World Association for Public Opinion Research), who is also joining for the first time, will give a presentation on research into the development of democratic principles and norms.

See also:

STEM Not for Women? How Gender Stereotypes Stop Women from Becoming Programmers and Engineers

Young women are often discouraged from careers in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics), resulting in fewer young engineers and programmers entering the labour market. A study by Natalia Maloshonok and Irina Shcheglova examines how and why gender stereotypes can disempower female students, leading to poor academic performance and high dropout rates.

HSE St. Petersburg’s Master’s Programme in Arts and Culture Management Partners with the Hermitage

As part of an agreement signed by HSE University and the State Hermitage in July 2019, the museum will become a partner of HSE–St. Petersburg’s Master’s programme in Arts and Culture Management. Hermitage staff will teach courses in the programme. The agreement also provides for joint projects and student internships at the museum.

Trust in Mask: How COVID-19 Has Changed the Attitude of Russians to Each Other

As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, when the whole country ended up in self-isolation, some people have to ask for support, others prepare themselves in readiness to provide it. Have Russians felt more cautious in recent months, or do people who have been forced to stay at home still remember how to trust and help? In order to find the answers to these questions, we can analyse the data from a new all-Russian survey conducted by HSE Centre for Studies of Civil Society and Non-Profit Sector.

Painted Eggs of Joy: The Meaning and Purpose of Easter Eggs in Folk Practices

Why are Easter eggs painted red? What can be done with consecrated eggshells? How did eggs become part of traditional rituals? Folklorist Andrei Moroz told IQ.HSE about some popular beliefs associated with Easter.

Emotional Must-haves: Which Feelings People Consider Most Important Today

People should radiate happiness but also be able to feel compunction; control themselves, but know when to give free rein to their feelings; love without suffering for it; and experience feelings of excitement and nostalgia without succumbing to emotional distress. Society adheres to a rather contradictory code for the expression of feelings or emotional imperatives. Feelings can lead to either a break in social ties or greater solidarity with others. In this article, IQ.HSE looks at emotional imperatives based on a report that HSE sociologist Olga Simonova presented at the XXI April Conference.

The Joy of Work: Which Russians Are Made Happier by Their Jobs

For Russians, job satisfaction plays a significant role in overall life satisfaction. This is especially true for those with higher education and of higher income levels, as well as those who are driven by professional and career achievements. One factor that does not have any effect, however, is gender. It is equally important for men and women that they love their work. These are the findings of a study conducted by the HSE Laboratory of Comparative Social Research (LCSR), which was presented at the XXI April International Academic Conference.

Fashion Designers in a Country of Shortages

Why was there always a shortage of fashionable clothing in the USSR? What was the typical career path for a Soviet fashion designer? Who had power and influence in the socialist fashion industry? HSE Associate Professor Yulia Papushina examined these questions by reconstructing the everyday life of the Perm Fashion House during the late socialism era. Her study is the first to look into the recent history of clothing design and manufacturing in Russian provinces.

It's All about Social Capital

Multiple factors determine how well immigrants can adapt to living in a new country. According to research, the key factors are social capital, i.e. having friends who can help with housing, employment and other basic needs, and the immigrant's approach to becoming part of their new community and culture (i.e. acculturation attitudes and strategies). A team of HSE researchers examined the relative importance of social capital and acculturation strategies for successful adaptation of immigrants from Central Asia and South Korea living in Moscow. 

A Proud ‘No’: Why Egalitarian Values Don’t Catch on in Post-Soviet Countries

People’s values of personal choice, suсh as their attitudes towards abortion, divorce, and premarital sex, are usually determined their level of education, age, religiosity, and social status. At least this is the case in many countries such as the US and those in Europe. In a recent study, HSE sociologists found that in post-Soviet countries, personal values are most determined by people’s level of patriotism.

Three to Ten: Why Families Choose to Have More Children, More Often

More than 500 large families in three Russian federal districts were surveyed to explore reasons why couples choose to have many children. Five main patterns were identified, driven by values (partner trust and religious beliefs), socioeconomic circumstances (income and education), and availability of support from extended family and friends.