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Illustration for news: Weeping Men: Why Misandry Flourishes in Russian Society

Weeping Men: Why Misandry Flourishes in Russian Society

Although Russia has traditionally been a patriarchal society, misandry—the sharp criticism of men, or ‘reverse sexism’—is on the rise. Women accuse men of every possible sin, from acting aggressively to being too passive at work and home, and from narcissism to general indifference. In a pilot study, HSE University researchers studied misandry in the women of two different generations.

Illustration for news: A Tindergarten of Love: Barriers to ‘Digital Romance’ and Strategies of Online Dating App Users

A Tindergarten of Love: Barriers to ‘Digital Romance’ and Strategies of Online Dating App Users

The Russian Academy of Science’s Institute of Sociology recently published a collective monograph on socio-technical barriers to the production, distribution and consumption of digital technologies entitled Adventures in Technology: Barriers to Digitalization in Russia. A number of chapters were written by HSE University researchers Konstantin Glazkov, Olga Logunova and Alisa Maximova. 

Illustration for news: Russian Scientists Predicted Increased Unrest in the United States back in 2010

Russian Scientists Predicted Increased Unrest in the United States back in 2010

Beginning in May 2020, after the police killing of George Floyd, ‘Black Lives Matter’ demonstrations and riots engulfed the United States, the United Kingdom, and several European countries. Though Mr. Floyd’s killing served as the immediate catalyst for the unrest, many scholars suggest that the COVID-19 pandemic and the resulting economic crisis played a deeper, more pivotal role in creating conditions that led to the protests.

Illustration for news: STEM Not for Women? How Gender Stereotypes Stop Women from Becoming Programmers and Engineers

STEM Not for Women? How Gender Stereotypes Stop Women from Becoming Programmers and Engineers

Young women are often discouraged from careers in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics), resulting in fewer young engineers and programmers entering the labour market. A study by Natalia Maloshonok and Irina Shcheglova examines how and why gender stereotypes can disempower female students, leading to poor academic performance and high dropout rates.

Illustration for news: Trust in Mask: How COVID-19 Has Changed the Attitude of Russians to Each Other

Trust in Mask: How COVID-19 Has Changed the Attitude of Russians to Each Other

As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, when the whole country ended up in self-isolation, some people have to ask for support, others prepare themselves in readiness to provide it. Have Russians felt more cautious in recent months, or do people who have been forced to stay at home still remember how to trust and help? In order to find the answers to these questions, we can analyse the data from a new all-Russian survey conducted by HSE Centre for Studies of Civil Society and Non-Profit Sector.

Illustration for news: Emotional Must-haves: Which Feelings People Consider Most Important Today

Emotional Must-haves: Which Feelings People Consider Most Important Today

People should radiate happiness but also be able to feel compunction; control themselves, but know when to give free rein to their feelings; love without suffering for it; and experience feelings of excitement and nostalgia without succumbing to emotional distress. Society adheres to a rather contradictory code for the expression of feelings or emotional imperatives. Feelings can lead to either a break in social ties or greater solidarity with others. In this article, IQ.HSE looks at emotional imperatives based on a report that HSE sociologist Olga Simonova presented at the XXI April Conference.

Illustration for news: The Joy of Work: Which Russians Are Made Happier by Their Jobs

The Joy of Work: Which Russians Are Made Happier by Their Jobs

For Russians, job satisfaction plays a significant role in overall life satisfaction. This is especially true for those with higher education and of higher income levels, as well as those who are driven by professional and career achievements. One factor that does not have any effect, however, is gender. It is equally important for men and women that they love their work. These are the findings of a study conducted by the HSE Laboratory of Comparative Social Research (LCSR), which was presented at the XXI April International Academic Conference.

Illustration for news: It's All about Social Capital

It's All about Social Capital

Multiple factors determine how well immigrants can adapt to living in a new country. According to research, the key factors are social capital, i.e. having friends who can help with housing, employment and other basic needs, and the immigrant's approach to becoming part of their new community and culture (i.e. acculturation attitudes and strategies). A team of HSE researchers examined the relative importance of social capital and acculturation strategies for successful adaptation of immigrants from Central Asia and South Korea living in Moscow. 

Illustration for news: A Proud ‘No’: Why Egalitarian Values Don’t Catch on in Post-Soviet Countries

A Proud ‘No’: Why Egalitarian Values Don’t Catch on in Post-Soviet Countries

People’s values of personal choice, suсh as their attitudes towards abortion, divorce, and premarital sex, are usually determined their level of education, age, religiosity, and social status. At least this is the case in many countries such as the US and those in Europe. In a recent study, HSE sociologists found that in post-Soviet countries, personal values are most determined by people’s level of patriotism.

Illustration for news: Three to Ten: Why Families Choose to Have More Children, More Often

Three to Ten: Why Families Choose to Have More Children, More Often

More than 500 large families in three Russian federal districts were surveyed to explore reasons why couples choose to have many children. Five main patterns were identified, driven by values (partner trust and religious beliefs), socioeconomic circumstances (income and education), and availability of support from extended family and friends.