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Regular version of the site

From Archaeological Dig to the Lecture Room

In 2013 the HSE Saint Petersburg Campus organized archaeological field work for students over the summer in Staraya Ladoga, about 120 kilometers away from the city. Adrian Selin, HSE Professor of History, told us about his impressions of the expedition and his future plans for archaeological research.

— Why did you choose Staraya Ladoga for the student  field trip?

It is the site of an ancient settlement dating from VIII – Х centuries, the Viking Era and earlier. The sub-strata of the Earthern Settlement has been under excavation for more than 100 years. The settlement strata of Staroladozhskoe, partly because of the dampness of the soil and partly because of the intense activity of early-medieval life, has kept antiquities made of leather, bone, and wood in very good condition. Unfortunately, our archaeological sources don’t give us  information about who the dwellers of the place were, but they give us a pretty good idea a of what everyday life was like in VIII-X centuries. In fact we are sure that daily life, house building traditions, and applied arts of the Scandinavians are better characterized by the antiquities in Staraya Ladoga, than by the burial mounds in Scandinavia and Finland, where there are hardly any ancient monuments of that era with such well-preserved cultural strata.

— Where there other reasons that influenced your choice of location for the students’ field trip?

One of the main reasons is the high professional standards of the leaders of the excavation team at Staraya Ladoga (in particular, A. Volkovitsky and A. Spelman) who have made it a great place for education and have taught us their archeological skills. I am deeply grateful to them and hope we can continue working together in the future.

European and American researchers of the Viking Era consider Staraya Ladoga to be one of the most important memorial complexes of the Eastern Baltics. The best way to evaluate its significance is in the Scandinavian context. In 2011, Swedish archaeologist Dan Carlsson, and I drew up an analytical note about the Viking antiquities in Russia for the Council of Europe.

Researchers are highly interested in these antiquities. The Nordic Dimension Partnership for Culture is looking into the potential for  archeological tourism to ancient sites  in Russia. The HSE Faculty of History in Saint Petersburg could use its wide experience in organizing archaeological field trips to organize international trips for foreign students. We have the potential to do it.

See also:

The Earliest Cat on the Northern Silk Road

HSE researchers Irina Arzhantseva and Heinrich Haerke from the Centre of Classical and Oriental Archaeology (Faculty of Humanities) have been involved in the discovery of the earliest domestic cat yet found in northern Eurasia. The presence of Dzhanik (as the archaeologists have begun to call the tomcat) implies that there was a reasonably large settlement with a sedentary population even 200 years before it was surrounded by big walls and was called a town.

Shedding Light on Mysteries of the Past

Michele Minardi, from Italy, holds a PhD in Archaeology from Sydney University and has spent a number of years in investigating Karakalpakstan in Uzbekistan. He has recently joined the team of Centre of Classical and Oriental Archaeology of the Institute for Oriental and Classical Studies as a Research Fellow. We spoke with Michele about his projects, teaching methods and expedition plans.

‘The Sense of Doing Something New Appeals to Me’

Professor Heinrich Haerke, a renowned archaeology expert, has been cooperating with HSE University researchers for a long time. This year he has joined HSE as a Professor at the recently formed Centre for Classical and Oriental Archaeology. He has talked to HSE News Service about his research interests, field projects, and teaching archaeology.

HSE Researchers and Students Discover Burials on Archaeological Expedition

History students and colleagues from the Institute of Archaeology of the Russian Academy of Sciences travelled to an excavation site in the North Caucasus region of southern Russia. HSE News Service spoke with Professor Andrey Vinogradov of the Faculty of Humanities about the burials they discovered, field work, and the joys of archaeology.

HSE Archaeologists Make Significant Discovery during Excavations in Agrigento

In 2019, HSE will begin accepting students to its new Master's programme in Classical and Oriental Archaeology for the first time. Prior to admission, however, prospective students had the opportunity to participate in an archaeological school in Sicily, where they discovered rare bronze phialae dating back to the 6th century BC during the excavations.